Mother Of All Wisteria Part 2

Just a quick post with a couple of pictures of one of my wisteria in development.
I recently took part of my pot collection to a local bonsai club show and sale to see if anyone was crazy enough to buy a few pots so I could keep my “pot” addiction funded. I brought along one of the big wisteria because it was in flower and might attracted more traffic to the sale table. Next thing I knew it was put into the show on display. It was also used for part of the day in the Japanese community center’s auditorium for a decorative show piece on their stage during several plays. I was very honored and glad that so many people admired it. I hope it looks even better for next year. As always, thanks for looking!

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The Mother Of All Wisteria

Being a grower at a large wholesale nursery does have it’s perks. Some employees take home office supplies…. I get plants! The nice thing about that is most plants I take home aren’t considered sellable nursery stock for garden centers or landscape projects so it’s all above board. They are however perfect for pre bonsai material. The “it” or “in” plants fall in and out of vogue with the gardening enthusiast. All it takes is a popular gardening show or magazine to feature the next “big plant” and last month’s feature is yesterday’s news. Gardener’s love for wisteria seems to take a roller coaster ride. Every few years it peeks, however wisteria sales are on a decline. People want plants that are low maintenance, preform well and easy to grow. Wisteria has no problem growing but most don’t bloom due to lack of pruning and fertilizing. This post was just an after thought. Sorry for the lack of quality photos. The nursery has twenty or so very old wisteria mother plants in 30+ gallon containers. Their purpose is to provide propagative material for new wisteria production. Absolutely beautiful to behold when they are all flowering. Much to my good fortune, there just so happened to be a few extra mother plants hanging around then required. Of course I suggested trying to make a couple of bonsai from one of the multi stem wisteria. I was ruthless in the procedure. Poor timing, buds already pushing and several very cold nights with frost definitely set back two out of the three stems. Step one was taking the pot off and sawing the root ball into three sections thus reclaiming the stems back to their single original form. Years ago three small individual wisteria where potted into one container to eventually form a large mother plant. I must have cut off 80% of the root system. Roots from one inch to six inches were cut with a sharp pruning saw. A bark mix with turface was used. This mix holds water which seems like a good idea for wisteria. If there is one lesson I can take away from this project, it would be don’t rush. I was so eager to work on this material I pushed it. I didn’t have the time or supplies ( large pots & better mix) to commit to it but I started anyway. The result wasn’t two out of three ain’t bad but…. two out of three were bad. A couple of heavy frosts didn’t help some of the newly forming buds either. Here are a few very poor quality pictures. Sorry. The scale of the plant is hard to tell in the pictures. In the pot it stood approx. 4 1/2 feet tall by about the same wide. Trunks are approx. 4 inches. The next steps will consist of compacting the branch structure and finding better pots. As always, thanks for looking.

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Size Does Matter Part 2

Planting up mame bonsai pots is no small task…. no pun intended. I have propagated several different plants from seed and cuttings for use in tiny pots. More information about my propagation methods can be supplied upon request. Today’s post highlights which plants I will be using in future parts of Size Does Matter. I have grown Ginkgo biloba, Larix lariciana, Taxodium distichum and Parthenocisses quinquefolia all from seed. Cotoneaster ‘Strieb’s findling’, Chamaecyparis obtuse ‘hagg’ and Juniperus procumbens nana all from cuttings. Seeds could be grown directly in the intended pot, however I find it more productive to grow them in plug form. After germination I transplant the seedling into the mame pot at an early stage of development. Following are the pics of plant material being used. As always, thanks for looking!
Ps..I had to include a pic of one of my Wisteria bonsai in development.

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Bigei Bonsai Pots

Hold a Bigei bonsai pot in your hand and right away it’s quality and the skill of this Japanese Tokoname potter is evident. Carved images, clean lines, glazed or unglazed in numerous shapes and sizes sums up this potter’s inventory. Definitely a pot for any tree. I only have a few of these pots but plan on adding more to my hoard. As always thanks for looking!

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Pictures Speak A Thousand Words

Got a cool little accent or bonsai plant?……then show it off in a hand painted Japanese mini pot. In the world of mini or mame bonsai and accent plants it seem that most anything goes for the style of pot when displaying. Unlike finished full sized bonsai, when a ornate or fancy pot may up stage it’s resident. Mame bonsai need all the help they can get. Keeping in mind I am very new to the bonsai world and really don’t know what I’m talking about….. you might what to ask your experienced bonsai club members before potting something up for a show. 🙂 Interesting tiny bonsai…… interesting tiny pot…. it’s a great formula for tiny fun! My friend said “all bonsai people are nerds.” I guess my name can be added to that list with that formula for fun. I’m sure only cool guys go to Vegas and marry strippers on the weekends….. not needle pluck pine. The little iris pot and blue cascade pot are by Japanese maker Yuuki Shoseki. The pair of white with red paint pots are made in a Seto area kiln. The last pair are painted with the Fox Wedding theme by Tosui. As always thanks for looking!

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Amphibious Bonsai Pots

Well the pots themselves aren’t amphibious. Just the little frogs hanging onto the sides. I thought Amphibious Bonsai Pots might be a great title. One of my last posts had the title Size Does Matter. I have never had so many hits on a post! The lesson here is title does matter…… or cheesy sexual references work. In today’s post I would like to show three tiny Japanese bonsai or accent plant pots with small frogs attached to their sides. Cool little pots that people always comment on when I display them. The light rose or wine / pink colored pot by Japanese maker Yamazaki Kouzan. The yellow and blue pots are made by Furumoto. As always thanks for looking!

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Mame Bonsai Pots By Tani Ganyo

My research skills are horrible. I rely on a couple of great online blogs like Japanese Bonsai Pots Blog, Sam & KJ’s Suiseki Blog and Peter Tea Bonsai Blog to fill this void. All are WordPress based. If it wasn’t for all of their efforts and passion for bonsai and all that goes with it, my knowledge wouldn’t continue to grow as much as it is. I’m truly grateful to anyone who takes the time to share their knowledge. Thanks!

Today’s post features a few of my Tani Ganyo mame pots. I was told this Japanese potter is the wife of another potter Tani Ranzan. I love both of their work. If I scrape together enough coin to travel to Japan, one of my stops would have to be the Tani pottery studio. Talk about one stop shopping! Cool little hand painted birds, flower blooms and bamboo adorn the sides of her pots. What’s not to like. There is something simple about the design that seems to connect well with the serenity and beauty of nature. The small bird on one of the pots reminds me of my Zeko Nakamura bird pot pictured in an earlier post. As always thanks for looking!

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